Book Corner 2019.35

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Good Omens by Terry Pratchett & Nail Gaiman

A crazy slouch towards Armageddon. I’d say it was more Pratchett than Gaiman. The jokes just never stop.

It was long and rambly, with a cast of characters to match. There were some I loved every time they appeared (Crowley, Aziraphale, Anathema – her name alone has to make you love her). At the other end were some that I really found repulsive, and disliked whenever they got airtime (Shadwell). I wasn’t crazy about Newt. As for the kids, they were good kid characters, but being American with little exposure to Britain, I just couldn’t reconcile those heavy accents (and ideas) coming out of children’s mouths. E.g., “I don’t see what’s so triffic about creating people as people, and then gettin’ upset ‘cos they act like people…” This is the 11-year-old Antichrist speaking. To me it just sounds like Andy Capp or one of those dimwitted Python characters.

Yes, the Antichrist; so anyway – the purported plot of the book is that the Antichrist comes to earth but gets switched at birth, and grows up without the proper diabolical “training.” So he just turns out to be a boy with a few superpowers, and isn’t really evil at all.

Meanwhile what happened to the baby who got the training? I’m not sure. If he turned up again at all, it was extremely rarely. So I thought this was going to be a big “switched at birth”, “nature vs. nurture” kind of subplot, but it wasn’t so much.

Then there were the Four [Motorcycle] Riders of the apocalypse. I read in the afterward that this was Gaiman’s main contribution. Those portions are a little less jokey, but I don’t know, things just didn’t really come together. Everything was just kind of wacky.

If you like Terry Pratchett, I think you’ll love it. if you’re looking for more Gaiman, I don’t really see it. (A crazy slouch towards Armageddon. I’d say it was more Pratchett than Gaiman. The jokes just never stop.

It was long and rambly, with a cast of characters to match. There were some I loved every time they appeared (Crowley, Aziraphale, Anathema – her name alone has to make you love her). At the other end were some that I really found repulsive, and disliked whenever they got airtime (Shadwell). I wasn’t crazy about Newt. As for the kids, they were good kid characters, but being American with little exposure to Britain, I just couldn’t reconcile those heavy accents (and ideas) coming out of children’s mouths. E.g., “I don’t see what’s so triffic about creating people as people, and then gettin’ upset ‘cos they act like people…” This is the 11-year-old Antichrist speaking. To me it just sounds like Andy Capp or one of those dimwitted Python characters.

Yes, the Antichrist; so anyway – the purported plot of the book is that the Antichrist comes to earth but gets switched at birth, and grows up without the proper diabolical “training.” So he just turns out to be a boy with a few superpowers, and isn’t really evil at all.

Meanwhile what happened to the baby who got the training? I’m not sure. If he turned up again at all, it was extremely rarely. So I thought this was going to be a big “switched at birth”, “nature vs. nurture” kind of subplot, but it wasn’t so much.

Then there were the Four [Motorcycle] Riders of the apocalypse. I read in the afterward that this was Gaiman’s main contribution. Those portions are a little less jokey, but I don’t know, things just didn’t really come together. Everything was just kind of wacky.

If you like Terry Pratchett, I think you’ll love it. if you’re looking for more Gaiman, I don’t really see it. ( *** 1/2 )

 

Book Corner 2019.34

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This Fight Is Our Fight by Elizabeth Warren

I don’t agree with Warren on all things. She doesn’t have a single good thing to say about business, ever; the Washington Post put it well in an editorial I just saw today about her latest proposed bill about regulating financial equity: that, typically, she was “overreaching” and “overwrought.”

For example, in the book she cites a commencement speech given by Michael Bloomberg where he criticizes the right for being too quick to demonize minorities, and the left for being too quick to demonize big business.

Her reaction is, well, overwrought. How dare he “equate” poor minorities with powerful big business? How come everyone else is not up in arms!

Because he didn’t “equate” them; not surprisingly, Warren fails to see she is a perfect example of what he’s talking about.

The book was big on elementary history lessons and rants. I wished there were more autobiography, and more of the informal case studies she starts off with. I really do like Senator Warren, respect her, and at the core of her message, agree with her – I would love to fix the system so that it works for the majority of Americans; that’s what the system is “for.” So, without overreaching or overreacting, let’s get to it! ( )